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General Interest

  • Adams, Scott. The Dilbert Principle. New York: HarperBusiness, 1996.
    • The view from cubicle-land has taken business schools by storm. Watch out for perfect characterizations of your boss--and perhaps yourself.
  • Belous, Richard S. and Lemco, Jonathan, Ed. NAFTA as a Model of Development. Albany: SUNY Press, 1997.
    • NAFTA was the arena for a major political battle led by Labor. For a better understanding of NAFTA's mixed record, take a look at some of the underlying issues.
  • Bernstein, Peter L. Against the Gods. The Remarkable Story of Risk . New York: John Wiley, 1996.
    • Bernstein explains how risk shapes markets, politics and personal lives. Far from dismal or dull, it's a fascinating read and a bestseller in the executive suite.
  • Hammer, Michael. Reengineering the Corporation. A Manifesto For Business Revolution. New York: HarperBusiness, 1993.
    • The original bestseller lays out the reengineering revolution. The word strikes fear in the hearts of many, but follow I Hammer's reasoning--it's an interesting viewpoint on problem-solving. Then take a look at the numerous restatements (many bestsellers) that follow this one.
  • Kay, J. A. Why Firms Succeed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
    • Kay studies the characteristics of success and its methods at work.
  • Levine, David I. Reinventing the Workplace. How Employees and Business Can Both Win. Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 1995.
    • UC Berkeley professor David Levine looks at the high-performance workplace, balancing the methodologies of management theorists with the stories of working people.
  • Levine, David I. et al. "What Works at Work". Industrial Relations 35 (no 3).
    • Dr. Levine edited this special issue of the IIR scholarly journal, the leading one in the field. Besides the usual empirical studies, look for some exciting successes in labor-management cooperation.
  • Moore, James F. The Death of Competition: Leadership and Strategy in the Age of Business Ecosystems. New York: HarperBusiness, 1996.
    • U.S. and international business are tightly linked, and we're in sore need of new strategies that balance local prosperity with global forces. Moore challenges managers to see the forest instead of the trees.
  • Samuelson, Robert J. The Good Life and its Discontents. The American Dream in the Age of Entitlement, 1945-1995. New York: Times Books, 1995.
    • Ah, the Dismal Science prevails in Newsweek contributor Samuelson's "lighten, up, America" pep talk. One worries that he may not have been south of the median income line; his conclusions might have differed.
  • Senge, Peter. The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the learning Organization. New York: Doubleday, 1990.
    • Senge's description of the "learning organization" may seem obvious, but it's had an enormous impact on management thinking. Notably, he understands the importance of equitable treatment of employees and the high value of their "common sense" abilities.

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Teams and Teamwork

  • Kotter, John P. Leading Change. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1996.
    • Kotter makes change management accessible here. It's a useful look at how managers view the challenge of building esprit de corps when change is so rapid.
  • Mankin, Don, et al. Teams and Technology. Fulfilling the Promise of the New Organization. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1996.
    • Understanding how technology and teamwork interact could help workers to prepare for the team-driven philosophy that's coming their way, and to make sure it transcends the "corporatism" of past change strategies.
  • Mintzberg, Henry, et al. "Some Surprising Things About Collaboration- Knowing How People Connect Makes It Work Better." Organizational Dynamics, Summer, 1996, p. 60.
    • Surprise! The people who study collaboration don t know how to do it themselves. The fact that a team of organization studies folks have come up with this conclusion about their own colleagues lends strength to the charge.
  • Prefer, Jeffrey. Competitive Advantage Through People. Boston: Harva$ Business School Press, 1996.
    • Overdue and well-stated, this book suggests plenty of ways to boost productivity and morale in partnership with plain old folks in the office in the wake of "downsizing" and "rightsizing".
  • Reichheld, Frederick F. (with Thomas Teal). The Loyalty Effect. The Hidden Force Behind Growth, Profits, and Lasting Value. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1996.
    • Another exploration of the lost promise of loyalty--and the hope of restoring it-in the post-downsizing world.

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Technology and the Workplace

  • Cusumano, Michael J. "The Limits of Lean". Sloan Management Review, Summer 1994, p. 27.
    • You've heard about lean production, maybe more than you care to. Now follow up on the logical limits to "Just in Time."
  • Lacy, Don. From Grunts to Gigabytes . Communications and Society. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1996.
    • A history of communication. Interesting background reading on technological change.
  • Nohria, Nitin and Eccles, Robert G. Ed. Networks and Organizations: Structure, Form, and Action. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1992.
    • The impact of networks on office work is the most important change in work since mass production. Read up on the larger issues here to get a sense of your own fate in the days to come.
  • Schrage, Michael. Shared Minds: The Emerging Technologies of Collaboration. New York: Random House, 1990.
    • Fascinating, iconoclastic, and provocative, Schrage makes the rhetoric of collaboration understandable. This title won the National Book Award.
  • Sproull, Lee. Connections: New Ways of Working in the Networked Organization. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1991.
    • Sproull maps the forces that govern day-to-day work in the networked office. During the 1996 school year, this was one of the most requested titles at the IIR Library.
  • Womack, James P. Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996.
    • The author of The Machine That Changed the World tackles lean production practices.
  • Yoffie, David B. "Competing in the Age of Digital Convergence." California Management Review 38 (no. 4), p. 31.
    • The convergence here has to do with the "bitstream"--if all information can be moved around as "bits," then formerly separate tasks (like buying, building, or paying for things) can be manipulated in altogether new ways.

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Organizations and People

  • Handy, Charles. "On the Future of Work and an End to the Century of the Organization." Organizational Dynamics, Summer 1996, p. 15.
    • Handy is articulate, visionary and compassionate. Read this interview to get a sense of where he sees work going in the future, but be ready to be worried for the lowest 30 percent of the unskilled workforce.
  • Kramer, Roderick M., and Tyler, Tom R. Trust in Organizations. Thousand Oaks: Sage, 1996.
    • Very technical and highly footnoted, but interesting--and, in light of the new interest in worker loyalty, perhaps there's something to learn here about trust in the changing organization.
  • Leach, Joy. A Practical Guide to Working With Diversity: The Process, the Tools, the Resources. New York: AMACOM, 1996.
    • AMACOM's titles are designed to be desktop aids to the manager. Here's one on diversity that captures the growing belief that workplace diversity can be a tool for effective management.
  • Moore, Michael. Downsize This! New York: Crown, 1996.
    • Anyone who loved the movie "Roger and Me" will like this book. Vitriolic at times, Moore nonetheless captures for workers "what's goin' on."
  • Pfeffer, Jeffrey "When It Comes To 'Best Practices'---Why Do Smart Organizations Occasionally Do Dumb Things?" Organizational Dynamics, Summer 1996, p. 33.
    • Workers will be shocked! Shocked! To learn that even the high-performance organization can make a goof every now and then. One of the leading scholars of the field takes a look at the less-than-shining moments we all have lived through at the office.
  • Tushman, Michael, et al. Winning Through Innovation: A Practical Guide to Leading Organizational Change and Renewal. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1997.
    • The contributors explore the ways firms can deal more effectively with major change processes.

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The Future

  • Institute for the Future. "Twenty-First Century Organizations: Reconciling Control and Empowerment". Menlo Park: Institute for the Future, 1995.
    • This privately-commissioned report was a source for many later studies. The authors declare that managers must learn how to balance centralized control with employee empowerment, or else fail utterly. They offer six models for future organizations.
  • Ohmae, Kenichi, Ed. The Evolving Global Economy: Making Sense of the New World Order. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1995.
    • Ohmae offers a look at the whole wide world, and how corporate leaders should approach it.
  • Wilms, Wellford W. Restoring prosperity: how workers and managers are forging a new industrial culture. New York: Times Business Books, 1996.
    • Wilms offers his view of the successes and failures of the high-performance workplace, and the effects of new work practices on traditional settings, such as factories and white collar firms.

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Recent Labor Law Publications

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Indexes, Guides, & Journals

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WWW Archived Materials

 

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